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STREET MEET PUBLIC PROJECT 2017 INVESTIGATES SOCIAL CAPITAL PRODUCTION IN A SERIES OF DURATIONAL AND PARTICIPATORY PUBLIC ART PROJECTS

 

WE HAVE ALL DRIVEN, CYCLED OR WALKED PAST SASKATOON’S WIDE ARRAY OF PUBLIC ART, AND IT HAS HELPED TO SHAPE OUR IDEA OF WHAT
‘PUBLIC ART’ MEANS. MANY OF US EXPECT IT TO BE PERMANENT, DURABLE, LARGE-SCALE AND SCULPTURAL. BUT ARE THERE OTHER POSSIBILITIES?

 

Street Meet Public Project 2017 is a three- day festival from Friday, September 22nd to Sunday, September 24th. Projects consist of contemporary public art based in social practice.

Taking the kitchen table as its conceptual and aesthetic starting point, Street Meet Public Project is a community project that presents the previously private happenings of domestic, intimate space in a process- and participation-based public art project. Activities performed in effort to “kill time,” or ward off boredom, which rarely garner productive merit in comparison to capitalist modes of production, are brought to the fore to illustrate their essential productive output: social capital. Can quotidian events such as playing a game of cards, learning to hook a rug, or sharing a cup of coffee with a stranger have a communal impact greater than grandiose capital investment, economic stimulus, or urban beautification? And to what extent do these subtler gestures address multiple communities on familiar, accessible, and effective terms? Centred on three kitchen tables placed throughout the Riversdale Neighbourhood in Saskatoon, Street Meet Public Project invites community and audience members to participate, engage, socialize, and learn over the course of a three-day public art project. With participatory and durational works happening at each of the three locations, participants are encouraged to consider the role of overlooked private sites of socialization in the production of cumulative community capital.

Participating artists include:

Lauren Cullen

Lauren Cullen is a PhD student in the joint Communication and Culture program at Ryerson and York University. She holds a M.A degree from the Women and Gender Studies Institute (University of Toronto) and works part time as a teacher and artist assistant. Her research explores the history and contemporary culture of hooked rugs and she uses rug making as a teaching and learning practice by connect the social practice of hooking rugs as a tool for radical education within institutional and public settings. Her art-based research practice involves designing and constructing hooked rugs and documenting her process through video. She has presented her video and research works at the Savannah College of Art and Design Biennial Art Symposium, the Kitchener Waterloo Art Gallery and has exhibited at Xpace Cultural Arts Centre, Gallery 1313 and The Fountain Gallery (Toronto). Lauren also facilitates workshops connecting the social practice of hooking rugs as critical pedagogy grounded in an anti-racist feminist framework (Carleton University Art Gallery, Ryerson, U of T, Humber College, Girls Art League).

Grainbin (Graham Olver)

Grainbin is the artist alias of Graham Olver. Grainbin’s art can be separated into two main focuses: graffiti and formal painting. He’s been “getting up” (spraypainting) prolificly for the last 10 years. Grainbin’s graffiti aesthetic is often inspired by retro-70’s and 80’s colours/patterns and expressionist/ naïve-wild strokes. His formal painting work differs greatly and has been concerned with hard edge painting with optic and trompe l’oeil qualities.

Laura Hale

Laura Hale is visual artist based out of Saskatoon SK, Canada. Her art practice involves site responsive work in public spaces, creating site-specific interactive experiences, developing and leading collaborative community-engaged projects, along with object making and design work. She spent this past summer in Saskatchewan’s far north (Stony Rapids, Fond du Lac, and Black Lake) leading a Saskatchewan Arts Board artist-in-communities project. Upcoming Laura is participating in Nuit Blanche Saskatoon and creating a large-scale installation commissioned by the MacKenzie Art Gallery for their annual gala in Regina. Laura studied at the University of Regina, SK and at Emily Carr University in Vancouver, BC. She has worked in the theatre and film industries and has been a fulltime, freelance artist and creative projects manager for over 10 years.

Cory Schewaga

Cory Schewaga was born in Saskatoon, SK, and raised on a farm just outside of the city. From early on, he has been fascinated with the past, whether it be the stories told to him, or from the exploration of old farms that have been in his family. Schewaga spent many weekends in and around the areas where his parents grew up. Family was a large part of life as a kid.  His heritage is Ukrainian and Polish, and ever since he was a kid, perogies were a staple, and with that, the making of perogies was an important activity.

David Stonhouse

David Stonhouse is a strong voice in the Saskatoon art scene: he is a Program Guide at the Remai Modern, a co-director of BAM artist collective, a writer and a visual artist. David’s abstract art explores colour, pattern and materiality. David makes “all-over” paintings that serve as scultpural objects. His work is inspired by a combination of disparate sources that include the painting canon, fashion, nature home décor and industrial design. While currently working primarily in mixed media painting; David has been experimenting in installation and sculpture and previously worked as a printmaker as well as a wheat paste street artist.

Stay connected via FaceBook, Instagram, and Twitter for updates regarding schedule and project information.

Street Meet in Riversdale

Street Meet Public Project takes place in the Riversdale District, one of Saskatoon’s oldest neighbourhoods.

To find out about the Riversdale Business Improvement District, visit their website.